Social Justice Fatigue

So what with the whole police murdering people (well, black males), the internet has exploded with outrage. And let’s be real, most every criticism is spot-on and quite true. But! And this but may be unpopular, but I’m so fucking sick of reading about it. I mean, I’M THE CHOIR! I’m the person that already agrees. So is pretty much everybody else that reads about it, because the racists and blind police advocates aren’t interested and they don’t really come across it. Is it really necessary to reblog/repost/whatever every single thing? Yes, it’s an outrage, yet, does anyone honestly think that posting about it will change anything? Like, seriously, does the perpetual outrage machine really think it’s helping to overload us with it?

I have only so many fucks to give. And you know what? I’m can’t care that much anymore. My outrage is fading. I just can’t bring myself to read all of it anymore. Yes, I agree, but what good does that do anyone?

Unfortunately, this ties into a broader issue. This is only one facet of the problems that stand in the face of progress. There’s so many more. I’ve personally detailed quite a few points where the police state is suffocating us, because I felt I had something to add. And I’m done now, because my thoughts are out there. I’ve added what I have to add.

There are so many problems in this world. If we do this every single time, how many people like me will be pushed away? If we freak the fuck out EVERY SINGLE TIME, then doesn’t that devaluate the currency of caring? Because I promise you, there will be another issue. This will happen again, and when it does, I want to care. I don’t want to be so tired of it that I can’t bring myself to stay up to date.

Like with “gamergate.” (how about we stop fucking adding gate to everything?). I agree that the response by sexists was terrible, but I couldn’t bring myself to stay up with it. I’m suffering from social justice fatigue.

Am I the only one?

Note: I suppose I should mention that nobody I follow here does that, so thank you and know this is more directed at liberal news organizations (Slate is the absolute worst), tumblr, and twitter.

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Voters Under 30: Meek, to inherit the Earth

The whole young people voting Democratic is an old idea, but it turns out, according to this very interesting Slate article, it’s actually a relatively new thing. I’ll let Jamelle Bouie explain:

“The generational divide in partisanship, for instance, didn’t exist 25 years ago, or at least, not in the same way. Take the 1988 electorate that chose Bush for president. There, Michael Dukakis won roughly the same share of seniors (49 percent) as he did voters younger than 30 (47 percent). Four years later, Bill Clinton won 43.5 percent of voters younger than 30 and 50 percent of voters 65 and older. If there was a generation gap, in other words, it was that older voters favored Democrats, not Republicans.”

And now:

“Simply put, when young people go to the polls they vote for Democrats and when older people cast their ballots, they vote for Republicans. And the gap is huge. In 2008, Barack Obama won 66 percent of voters younger than 30 compared with 47 percent of voters 60 and older. Likewise, in the Republican wave election of 2010, congressional Democrats suffered their largest losses with older voters and had their best performance with the millennial generation. In 2012, President Obama gave a repeat performance on both scores, winning 60 percent of voters younger than 30 and losing 56 percent of voters 65 and older. This year, Democrats won 54 percent of the youngest voters while 57 percent of senior voters went to Republicans.”

However, a good look at those numbers shows a definite peak. Obama 2008 was 66% under 30. Democrats in 2010 were at 58% under 30 (from here). Obama 2012 was 60% under 30. And finally, Democrats in 2014  were at 54%. Both the Democratc numbers and Obama’s go down, so what this article represents as a continuing surge really looks more like a peak and a dropoff. There’s no reason to assume this will stay the same (although I certainly hope so).

Okay, let’s hit up one more quote:

“In the 1990s, a substantial number of older voters—if not most older voters—belonged to the Greatest Generation, the men and women who grew up in the Depression and fought in World War II. They were New Deal Democrats in their formative years, and they kept that affiliation through the rest of the 20th century.”

Implying, of course, that once the upcoming generations become that older electorate, the United States will become a stronghold of Democrats. I suppose we’ll see, but we should heed the dire warning of gridlock and dysfunction in the meantime.

Report from a Concerned World Citizen

States in Africa are becoming more authoritarian to deal with rebels and terrorist threats, including Nigeria, Libya, Egypt, and Kenya. In Europe, right wing Nationalists are more popular than ever, both in the east and west, and the Ukraine/Russia conflict is spiraling badly out of control. Asia is suffering from several serious issues (it’s rather large, so let’s split it up into impacted regions).

First, the situation in the Middle East is getting worse, more war, more authoritarianism, and way too much death, all while Israel continually ignores and fucks with Palestinians. China and India are competing for influence in the nations between them. China and the entire east coast of Asia are duking it over territorial waters (see Nine-dotted line), not to mention the water rights issues plaguing Southeast Asia.

In South America, Brazil is proving dominant, yet its issues with corruption and ineffectiveness are tearing at the seams of their society, all while the drug trade continues and Argentina battles its creditors. Mexico is fraying, and fraying bad, and Canada is increasing it’s anti-terrorism campaign in light of the recent attacks. The USA has a starkly conservative legislature that can’t override a presidential veto.

Gridlock, war, and economic decay on a wide scale. But hey, at least we got gay marriage.

A Quiet War

There’s a quiet competition among the most aggressive nations of the world (US, Russia, China) where they hack each other constantly. It’s been in the news over and over the past couple years, this system compromised, that system compromised. The US is marginally more transparent than Russia or China, so we know about our failings whereas our attacks on them are generally kept quiet.

The US, in all it’s entrepreneurial spirit, has a homegrown private “Cyber-security” industry. In quotes, because in all reality, security and offense are the same thing. Attack your own systems to find weakness. Remove weakness. But, this “security” is really just internal attacks. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, with the added bonus that you can still use it to kill them.

Some day, it will escalate. Where and when, who knows? But it will and then we’ll see what computer warfare is all about.

Pray tell, wtf is a Ba’athist?

From Wikipedia:

A Ba’athist society seeks enlightenment, renaissance and rebirth of Arab culture, values and society. It supports the creation ofsingle-party states, and rejects political pluralism in an unspecified length of time – the Ba’ath party theoretically uses an unspecified amount of time to develop an enlightened Arabic society. Ba’athism is based on principles of Arab nationalism, pan-Arabism, Arab socialism, as well as social progress. It is a secular ideology. A Ba’athist state supports socialist economics to a varying degree, and supports public ownership over the heights of the economy but opposes the confiscation of private property. Socialism in Ba’athist ideology does not mean state socialism or economic equality, but modernisation; Ba’athists believe that socialism is the only way to develop an Arab society which is truly free and united.

The article goes on to note that Syria and Iraq (formerly) are actually neo-Ba’athist, given that they’re not actually Ba’athist, as they didn’t promote pan-Arabism, social progress, or socialism. Essentially, it’s just tyranny hiding under a progressive cloak. But I look at that agenda and I think, you know, maybe REAL Ba’athism is really what Iraq needs right now. There aren’t any, sadly, so instead we’re reminded that once again, when an idealistic group takes over a government, those ideals are often subverted and authoritarianism takes hold.